Why I Use The Client-Centered Approach To Therapy

Client Centered Medicine Client Centered Therapy Heroic Client 

I got a rock embedded in my knee, and a chance to reflect on why the Client Centered Approach to medicine and therapy works.

I got a rock embedded in my knee, and a chance to reflect on why the Client Centered Approach to medicine and therapy works.

Recently, I spent a little over an hour in an Emergency Room after having a mishap on my road bike while cycling in Maui. Having had my start in college in Nursing School completing the usual clinical rotations, the ER is a familiar place. There are machines that beep, locked glass cabinets with temperature controls and potent drugs, every kind of needle gauge and tubing within the push of a doctor’s exam room chair, and a crash cart ready to be used to save a life. 

Once the ER physician debrided the wound and extracted the piece of asphalt jutting out of the fatty tissue below my patella, I began my usual routine of assessing the state of healthcare from the distal end. “How are we doing?” was the question. While my practice exists in an office outside of the world of the hospital, I am still very much inside the healthcare world.  And when I am the patient, it gives me a chance to assess the power of client-centered medicine and therapy.

We didn’t do so well that day. Though the visit was quick and the experience not particularly unpleasant for what it was,  I began to wonder what happened to the client-centered approach as I ambled into the ER reception area. No one offered me wheelchair. And if that shocks you to hear that, as blood dribbled out of my knee, this wasn’t the first time. I had an experience only eight months earlier, where I had to hold myself up with the sliding glass doors of an ER as I dragged my dehydrated body towards the reception desk. It took two people to finally call someone to bring the wheelchair. Forty-five minutes later, I begged a nurse to give me water to swish out my mouth to clear it of the taste of vomit.

Really?

Yes, really.

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    Posted in Client-centered Therapy, Health care, Psychology, Therapy | Leave a comment

    Time to Get Cooking

    Nutrition, Health, Weight Loss, Mental Health, Food News

    In Seattle, it’s easy to believe we have reached Spring, as there are flowers and trees blooming, and afternoon temperatures have reached the 50’s and low 60’s. Yes, we feel for you on the East Coast, and then the rest of us are walking around town with big smiles on our faces, taking in the sunshine, riding our bicycles on the roads and trails, or like the Man-Geek did, gliding his SUP (standup paddleboard) on a local lake.

    Nutrition is essential to physical and mental health. It's time to start cooking and make nutritious foods that are free of yuck. Photo by Imei, taken on an iPhone 5S.

    Nutrition is essential to physical and mental health. It’s time to start cooking and make nutritious foods that are free of yuck. How about gluten free flatbread for a pizza dough free from corn, soy, and wheat? Photo by Imei, home bread machine, taken on an iPhone 5S.

     

    Just about every week of winter, one of the major journals, whether it be Nature, Cell, or Scientific American, has released new information about the consequences of eating processed foods with chemicals, or about the mysteries of the intestinal microbiome, what I call our “second brain.” Heart disease, obesity, and GI disorders are just some of the consequences of eating out or eating in with processed foods and additives, along with lack of exercise, increased stress, and poor sleep/rest patterns.

    How are the of spring weather and nutrition related? Simply this: you can’t get out and enjoy the great outdoors unless you take time to get cooking in the kitchen and learn to eat real food. Do one without the other, and you miss the benefit of both. Here’s three reasons why you need to learn how to cook and eat real food at home, and most likely, select your food choices more carefully when you go out to eat.

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      Posted in Change, Psychology | Tagged , , , , , , | Leave a comment

      On Mind Reading

      Mind Reading Expectations can be toxic to your relationship. Find out how you can hack your fairytale and drop the MRE's.

      Mind Reading Expectations can be toxic to your relationship. Find out how you can hack your fairytale and drop the MRE’s.

      Mind Reading, Expectations, Emotional Intelligence, Valentine’s Day

      Given that I don’t watch much television (“any” turned into “much” once I started watching “Downton Abby”), I find watching commercials a rare event in my life. Other than the carefully crafted and clever Super Bowl commercials, I find myself doing a lot to avoid advertisements selling me the latest and greatest.

      I especially find Valentine’s Day advertisements annoying. Why? Because many of them focus on just a handful of clichéd themes surrounding the nature of romance. Usually, there is  an engendered story: man needs to buy his wife a gift to show that he loves her, and he feels pressured to pick just the right thing without being told what might make her happy. Get it right, and she’s happy and over the moon! Get it wrong, and he’s in the doghouse for days to come. 

      What are we really seeing here? It’s the management of expectations, specifically around that of mind reading, called Mind Reading Expectations, or MRE. The man is supposed to know what the woman wants without her having to tell him, a sort of, “Where’s the fun in that?” mixed with, “He should know me by now.”

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        Posted in Emotional Intelligence, Psychology, Romance | Tagged , , | Leave a comment