Adapting To The Unexpected

If I had run here instead of on a trail closer to home, I wouldn’t have an infected dog bite. Life’s unexpected moments happen. Are you prepared to handle them? Photo credit: Imei Hsu, iPhone 7 Plus

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Emergencies | Unexpected Events | Assessment |Anxiety

The morning sunlight hit the red-tinged leaves that signal Fall’s inevitable approach. Trail running along one of the paths nearby my home, I listened to the sound of my footfalls and my breath cycle, deeply immersed in the joy of running.

After the first fifteen minutes or so,  the effort of running changes from the initial discomfort of ramping up the pace from a standstill to the zen-like quality of meditation in motion.  Running has often been a place of solace and rejuvenation for me, a place to deposit myself before I return to the real world: responding to crisis and employing my skills and attention to the privilege of helping others.

As I began to run up a short embankment with a neighborhood access point to a street, I passed a dog owner walking three dogs. As it is my custom, if a dog is not on a tight leash, I give dogs a very wide berth to avoid startling them or giving them reason to attack. As I moved far to the right of the owner and the dogs, the dog furthest on the dog owner’s right lunged towards the back of my leg and bit me.

After the owner saw blood running down my leg, the dog owner asked if I needed her help: a ride home, bandages, etc. My first response was to tell her I would just walk home, that I was “OK” but it hurt, that I only had five more miles to go.

But that was ridiculous. The wounds  gaped, the torn fascia hung outside of the broken skin, blood was filling my shoe, and the pain was so bad that tears were involuntarily shedding and rolling down my face. I sat down on a rock nearby, and then told the dog owner that I needed a ride home to pick up my car and my ID for the Urgent Care facility nearest to me.

I needed  help. And I needed to be flexible to handle the very real emergency that had just occurred.

Does this sound familiar to you? Do you find if difficult to ask for and receive help, even when it is clearly needed? Do you find yourself frozen or rigid, trying to keep to a schedule or a plan instead of adapting to the circumstances you find yourself in during an unexpected moment.

Read on for what you can do when you encounter the unexpected. Continue reading “Adapting To The Unexpected”

A Tale of Technology and Connection

A Tale of Technology (and Connection)

You might not have been around when phones came with long cords so you could drag them from room to room. Technology changed all that, and then some. Read about my recent experience with upgrading to new technology and changing with the times. Photo from Pixabay, no attribution needed.

Do you get nostalgic when it comes time to replace or discard old technology? Have you ever been caught off-guard by your own feelings when you encounter old tech and gadgets? And does your answer have anything to do with counseling?

When I celebrated my 50th birthday,  friends fêted me with a party that included homemade, allergen-free food, and reminders of my childhood. including an electronic memory game called, Simon.  Soon, I was reminiscing about everything from rotary phones with exceptionally long telephone cords to the different PC models that would have been the backdrop of every geeky kid’s experience in America.  Where were you when the TRS-80 (later called the Model I) was revealed on August 3, 1977? Continue reading “A Tale of Technology and Connection”

If You Build It Will They Come

 

I’m still here (and not just a hologram)! Read more about the transition from an office to online and telephonic counseling.

The line from the movie, Field of Dreams, is:

If you build it, they will come.

Yet I admit, up until last week, I did not know for sure if the line was true. I stated it as a question, “If you build it, will they come?”

For the last couple of years, I prepared for a transition from a stand-alone, brick-and-mortar private practice office that provided supervision for new therapists, counseling and coaching services, and a sub-speciality in autoimmune and chronic disease support, into an online and telephonic practice that would allow others to access services from different time zones, and free me to travel where I am needed. Supervision of new therapists earning hours towards licensure would also happen over the Internet and phone.

Two weeks ago, I worked furiously to pack up the office, donate some of the furniture, and begin to set up a home office base. I bid my office farewell, and yes, I did shed a few tears.

The home business license arrived in time, the movers came and moved my furniture and boxes, and I took a little time to put my head into a Half Ironman distance race in the beginning of June.

You might be wondering if the movie quote is true. Read on to find out.

Continue reading “If You Build It Will They Come”