If You Build It Will They Come

 

I’m still here (and not just a hologram)! Read more about the transition from an office to online and telephonic counseling.

The line from the movie, Field of Dreams, is:

If you build it, they will come.

Yet I admit, up until last week, I did not know for sure if the line was true. I stated it as a question, “If you build it, will they come?”

For the last couple of years, I prepared for a transition from a stand-alone, brick-and-mortar private practice office that provided supervision for new therapists, counseling and coaching services, and a sub-speciality in autoimmune and chronic disease support, into an online and telephonic practice that would allow others to access services from different time zones, and free me to travel where I am needed. Supervision of new therapists earning hours towards licensure would also happen over the Internet and phone.

Two weeks ago, I worked furiously to pack up the office, donate some of the furniture, and begin to set up a home office base. I bid my office farewell, and yes, I did shed a few tears.

The home business license arrived in time, the movers came and moved my furniture and boxes, and I took a little time to put my head into a Half Ironman distance race in the beginning of June.

You might be wondering if the movie quote is true. Read on to find out.

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Come With Me

Back in January 2017, I alluded to some new changes to the way Seattle Direct Counseling would do business. I knew informing my current client community would take a couple of months to begin getting the word out and discussing those changes, and now the time has come to broadcast the exciting news.

Drumroll, please!

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Preventing the Bonk In Life

Preventing the Bonk in Life
By B. Imei Hsu, BSN-RN, MAC-LMHC, Artist

A professional trainer described a recent race involving a young athlete who ran out of steam just before the finish line. Slated to win, her body went from flight to a sudden near stand-still, while her competitors sprinted past her. Trainers and athletes call this response a bonk, when the athlete experiences a depletion of muscle glycogen or a brain depletion of blood glucose. This usually happens when the athlete either did not eat properly before the race, or in the case of an endurance race, the athlete did not replace the necessary protein-carbohydrate ratio needed to replenish glycogen stores. In this case, the young girl simply stopped running because there was no more “giddy yup” left in her leg muscles. As I’ve been reading about the kind of training and nutrition I will need to comfortably run my first 10K race and begin training for my first half-marathon, I’ve noticed similarities between a mild physical bonk I experienced after running more than 10K, and life experiences and challenges that can set you up for what I’m calling a life bonk. Here are a few ways to look at a bonk and how you may prevent a life bonk.

Watch this video to see runner Jonathan Raymond hitting the bonk just 100 meters from the finish line in the 2009 Canberra Marathon

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